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HomeAuthor's Article(s) Mark Brookstein

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has announced an immediate stay and review of an Obama-era policy requiring pay information to be included on form EEO-1.  The revised form was set to take effect with the next filing cycle in March 2018. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has always required companies to report […]

Remember last November when a federal judge put a temporary hold on significant changes to federal labor laws affecting millions of workers and their employers?  We wrote about it here. Last week, the judge issued a final ruling that struck down the proposed changes, which would have required employers either to substantially increase the pay […]

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (in Chicago) ruled on April 4, 2017, that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 – which prohibits workplace discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin – includes discrimination based upon an employee’s sexual orientation. While the federal agency that enforces […]

May 02, 2016

Mark Brookstein

NLRB

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Last week, McDonald’s and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) faced off in an administrative court to determine whether the fast-food chain is liable for the actions of its franchisees as a joint employer. The case arose out of hundreds of complaints filed by fast food workers alleging they were illegally threatened, disciplined, or fired […]

Currently, employers are not required to pay overtime (time and a half) to “exempt” employees who earn at least $23,660 per year ($455 per week). Exempt employees are those employed in bona fide executive, administrative, computer and outside sales positions. (For more info, check out http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/fairpay/fs17d_professional.pdf) That could change rather drastically. The DOL has issued […]

On June 1, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court held that in order to prevail in a disparate-treatment claim, an applicant need show only that her need for accommodation was a motivating factor in the employer’s decision, not that the employer had actual knowledge of her need. In 2008, Samantha Elauf, a Muslim woman, applied for […]

The Illinois Appellate Court recently issued a decision changing a fundamental aspect of the law on non-compete agreements in Illinois—which may cast doubt on the enforceability of non-compete agreements your company has put in place with new employees in the last two years. Prior to the court’s decision, Illinois law allowed an employer to enforce […]

Along with the New Year come a number of changes to Illinois law that are certain to impact employers. The following changes took effect January 1, 2014: Social Media. The Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act, which was amended effective January 1, 2013 to prohibit employers from requiring employees to disclose usernames and passwords […]

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